Part of an ongoing exploration of language and thought, these drawings begin with words or phrases (usually related to some sort of anxiety) that are translated through graphite on paper and cut paper inlay into abstracted visual forms. All of the drawings are worked on simultaneously and I usually lay one on top of the other when I make cuts so the pieces that are extracted are an exact match. Those pieces are then transplanted and inset within other drawings. Through this process, each drawing contains fragments of the others. The images that result are moments within a stream of thinking and forgetting — records of memories lost, found and transforming.

The process is related to intarsia, the intricate woodworking technique utilized in the creation of the Gubbio Studiolo (ca. 1479–1482) on permanent exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. One of the original functions of the studiolo was to act as an aid for associative thinking. These drawings act as my own, portable studiolo, where contemplation can go hand in hand with forgetting.